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Mann, Newton (1836-1926)

Newton Mann was born at Cazenovia, New York, January 6, 1836, the son of Darwin H. and Cordelia (Newton) Mann. He was the descendant of sturdy New England ancestors who had settled in Massachusetts before 1644. When he was twelve years of age the death of his father thrust heavy responsibilities upon him, but in spite of his burdens he persevered in his studies, graduated from Cazenovia Academy and ultimately become a thorough scholar.…

Rowena Morse and Newton Mann

Cummings, Edward (1861-1926)

Edward Cummings was the son of Edward Norris and Lucretia Frances (Merrill) Cummings and was born at Colebrook, N. H., April 20, 1861. He received his A.B. at Harvard in 1883 and A.M. in 1885. Then followed three years of sociological study in Europe as the first incumbent of the Robert Treat Paine Fellowship in Social Science.…

Hale, Edward (1858-1918)

Edward Hale was ordained Associate Minister with Dr. Edward Everett Hale by the South Congregational (Unitarian) Church, Boston, on October 14, 1886. Mr. Hale was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, on February 22, 1858, the son of William Bainbridge and Amelia Porter Hale.…

Forbes, John Perkins (1855-1910)

John Perkins Forbes was born in Middleboro, Massachusetts, March 25, 1855. He attended the public schools of Middleboro, and was, for a time, a pupil in Middleboro Academy. Later the family moved to Westboro, Massachusetts, and there he began the study of law.…

Stafford, Rick (1932-)

Rick Stafford has been a part of the Harvard Scene as an employee. He was born in Newton, Massachusetts in 1932. His parents were both professional oil painters. As a teenager he did odd jobs on Saturday mornings for Arthur Loveridge, the Curator of the reptile collection at the Museum of Comparative Zoology.…

Rick Stafford, Photographer

Tillich, Paul (1886-1965)

When Hitler came to power, this vigorously anti-Nazi philosopher of power was the first non-Jewish professor to be expelled from his post. Thanks to Reinhold Neibuhr’s efforts, Paulus Johannes Tillich became one of Hitler’s gifts to the New World. This rare and original interpreter of the meaning and value of existence has been highly honored by theist and humanist, Jew and Christian and Buddhist.…

Paul Tillich

Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre (1881-1955)

A contribution of great thought came from a priest who came to the shores of the United States in 1951 and died and was buried here in 1955. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, the Roman Catholic paleontologist taught us new ways in which religion is related to science.…

Pierre Teilhard de chardin

Murray, John Courtney (1904-1967)

The first book of John Courtney Murray was We Hold These Truths: Catholic Reflections on the American Proposition. When it was published in 1960, Time magazine ran a feature article and also put Murray’s picture on the cover as “unquestionably the intellectual bellwether of this new Catholic and American frontier” of building the city.…

John Courtney Murray

Wise, Stephen (1874-1949)

Consider “Stephania”—the code word of hope that spread from captive to captive in the Nazi death camps. This symbol of longing for liberation from unutterable atrocities sprang up in tribute to an American rabbi who was known to be working with all his might to rescue victims of Hitler’s reign of horror.…

Stephen Wise

Fosdick, Harry Emerson (1878-1969)

When he was seven, Harry’s mother collapsed. Caring for three children amidst deepening debt were factors in her first nervous breakdown. Later on she sought to comfort her son amidst his dread that he had committed an unpardonable sin, which would thrust him into the everlasting hell described by their family pastor’s fire and brimstone sermons.…

Henry Emerson Fosdick