a digital library of Unitarian Universalist biographies, history, books, and media
the digital library of Unitarian Universalism
Home » Poetry, Prayers & Visual Arts » Ann Bradstreet: My Winter’s Past

Ann Bradstreet: My Winter’s Past

As spring the winter does succeed,
And leaves the naked trees do dress,
The earth all black is clothed in green;
At sunshine each their joy express.
My sun’s returned with healing wings.
My soul and body do rejoice;
My heart exults and praises sings
To You who heard my wailing voice.
My winter’s past, my storms are gone,
And former clouds now seem all fled;
But, if they must eclipse again,
I’ll run where I was amply fed.
I have a shelter from the storm,
A shadow from the fainting heat;
I have access unto Your throne
You who are God so wondrous great.

Anne Bradstreet (c.1612–1672), an immigrant from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, was the first woman to have her writings published in America. From a prominent Puritan family, both her father and husband served as governors of the colony. Bradstreet wrote on domestic and religious themes. Her poems document the difficulties of being a woman in Puritan New England. She was America’s first published poet.

Series Navigation<< Book of Common Prayer: Forgive Us, O GodMarguerite Harmon Bro: For Trees >>
Categories: Poetry, Prayers & Visual Arts

Notable in UU History
Samuel West (of New Bedford)

Samuel West (of New Bedford) (1730-1807)

Samuel West, the fourth minister of that part of Dartmouth which now makes the city of ... Read More
http://www.wolfkiller.net/Links/mary1.jpg

Mary Porter Tileson Hemenway

1820-1894 The Life of Mary Porter Tileson Hemenway Mary Hemenway was born in New York of ... Read More
William Pickering

William Pickering: Space Explorer, 1910-2004

From The New Zealand Edge The launch of Sputnik in 1957 forced the United States into ... Read More
Charles Hartshorne in 1991

Charles Hartshorne: Psychicalism

By Donald Wayne Viney Human experience provides the clearest example of the novel actualities that emerge ... Read More