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“Our Church, As Seen by Religious Geography,” by Ron Clark

“Our Church, As Seen by Religious Geography”

A sermon by Ron Clark, October 9, 1972

at the First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City, Utah

The major thesis of this discourse is that Unitarianism went where New Englanders went. Thus, Unitarian extension was a matter of population trend more than denominational effort.

  1. If this thesis is correct, then how do usual Unitarian histories need to be corrected?
  2. Is this brief document a warning against a tendency to see trends within the denomination as paramount, when often in actuality, trends without the denomination may be determinative?

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